President Zelensky hails another 'victory' as Ukraine sweeps Eurovision

·4 min read
Members of the band "Kalush Orchestra" (C and R) celebrate onstage with Ukraine's flags as (From L) Italian television presenter Alessandro Cattelan, Italian singer Laura Pausini and Lebanese-born British singer-songwriter, Mika applaud, after winning on behalf of Ukraine the Eurovision Song contest 2022 on May 14, 2022 at the Pala Alpitour venue in Turin. (Photo by Marco BERTORELLO / AFP) (Photo by MARCO BERTORELLO/AFP via Getty Images) - MARCO BERTORELLO/AFP via Getty Images
Members of the band "Kalush Orchestra" (C and R) celebrate onstage with Ukraine's flags as (From L) Italian television presenter Alessandro Cattelan, Italian singer Laura Pausini and Lebanese-born British singer-songwriter, Mika applaud, after winning on behalf of Ukraine the Eurovision Song contest 2022 on May 14, 2022 at the Pala Alpitour venue in Turin. (Photo by Marco BERTORELLO / AFP) (Photo by MARCO BERTORELLO/AFP via Getty Images) - MARCO BERTORELLO/AFP via Getty Images

Ukrainian band Kalush Orchestra won the Eurovision Song Contest in the early hours of Sunday in a clear show of support for the war-ravaged nation.

The six-man band that mixes traditional folk melodies and contemporary hip hop in a purposeful defence of Ukrainian culture was the sentimental and bookmakers' favourite among the 25 bands and performers competing in the grand finale. The public vote from home was decisive in securing their victory.

The band's front man, Oleg Psiuk, took advantage of the enormous global audience to make an impassioned plea to free fighters still trapped beneath a sprawling steel plant in the southern port city of Mariupol following the six-man band's performance.

"I ask all of you, please help Ukraine, Mariupol. Help Azovstal, right now," the band's front man, Oleh Psiuk, said, to the live crowd of some 7,500, many of whom gave a standing ovation, and global television audience of millions.

The plea to free the remaining Ukrainian fighters trapped beneath the Azovstal plant by Russians served as a sombre reminder that the hugely popular and at times flamboyant Eurovision song contest was being played out against the backdrop of a war on Europe's eastern flank.

Members of the band "Kalush Orchestra" pose onstage with the winner's trophy and Ukraine's flags after winning on behalf of Ukraine the Eurovision Song contest 2022 on May 14, 2022 at the Pala Alpitour venue in Turin. (Photo by Marco BERTORELLO / AFP) (Photo by MARCO BERTORELLO/AFP via Getty Images) - MARCO BERTORELLO/AFP via Getty Images
Members of the band "Kalush Orchestra" pose onstage with the winner's trophy and Ukraine's flags after winning on behalf of Ukraine the Eurovision Song contest 2022 on May 14, 2022 at the Pala Alpitour venue in Turin. (Photo by Marco BERTORELLO / AFP) (Photo by MARCO BERTORELLO/AFP via Getty Images) - MARCO BERTORELLO/AFP via Getty Images

President Volodymyr Zelensky gave signs that he was watching from Kyiv, and rooting for the Ukrainian band.

"Indeed, this is not a war, but nevertheless, for us today, any victory is very important," Zelensky said, according to a .presidential statement. "So, let's cheer for ours. Glory be to Ukraine!"

Kalush Orchestra was among 25 bands performing in the Eurovision Song Contest final front of a live audience in the industrial northern city of Turin, while millions more watched on television or via streaming around the world.

Fans from Spain, Britain and elsewhere entering the PalaOlimpico venue from throughout Europe were rooting for their own country to win. Still, Ukrainian music fan Iryna Lasiy said she felt global support for her country in the war and "not only for the music."

Russia was excluded this year after its invasion of Ukraine, a move organisers said was meant to keep politics out of the contest that promotes diversity and friendship among nations.

This undated handout picture released by the Ukrainian President Administration press-service shows Ukrainian fighters at the Azovstal steelworks of Ukrainian city of Mariupol. (Photo by Ukrainian President Administration press-service / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Ukrainian President Administration press-service" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS (Photo by STR/Ukrainian President Administrati/AFP via Getty Images) - Ukrainian President Administration press-service / AFP
This undated handout picture released by the Ukrainian President Administration press-service shows Ukrainian fighters at the Azovstal steelworks of Ukrainian city of Mariupol. (Photo by Ukrainian President Administration press-service / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / Ukrainian President Administration press-service" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS (Photo by STR/Ukrainian President Administrati/AFP via Getty Images) - Ukrainian President Administration press-service / AFP

Ukraine's song, "Stefania," was written as a tribute to the frontman's mother, but has transformed since the war into an anthem to the beleaguered nation, as lyrics take on new meaning. "I'll always find my way home, even if all roads are destroyed," Kalush Orchestra frontman Oleh Psiuk wrote.

The six-member, all-male band received special permission to leave the country to represent Ukraine and Ukrainian culture at the music contest. One of the original members stayed to fight, and the others plan to return as soon as the contest is over.

Back in Ukraine, in the battered northeastern city of Kharkiv, Kalush Orchestra's participation in the contest is seen as giving the nation another platform to garner international support.

"The whole country is rising, everyone in the world supports us. This is extremely nice,? said Julia Vashenko, a 29-year-old teacher.

"I believe that wherever there is Ukraine now and there is an opportunity to talk about the war, we need to talk,? said Alexandra Konovalova, a 23-year-old make-up artist in Kharkiv. "Any competitions are important now, because of them more people learn about what is happening now."

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