These are the jobs in demand right now

·3 min read

Even as the economy opens up, more than 9 million unemployed workers still need jobs. To find one, it’s important to look in the right place, according to one expert.

While industries, like printing and public transportation, may be more stagnant, there are a handful of industries looking to load up on workers with certain skills, according Rick Cobb, executive vice president of New Markets at Keystone Partners.

“Nearly all the high-end, growth jobs need talent with math, data analytics, and strategic skills,” Cobb said, also noting that smaller cities are seeing an influx in job opportunities. “[Second] tier cities are also seeing large immigration numbers. There may be a general flight from the larger metropolitan areas, but this benefits the smaller cities where skilled labor is still needed.”

Here’s where to look.

A man wearing a face mask walks past a sign
A man wearing a face mask walks past a sign "Now Hiring" in front of a store amid the coronavirus pandemic on May 14, 2020 in Arlington, Virginia. (Photo by OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images)

Health care

The COVID-19 crisis amplified the demand for highly-skilled healthcare workers. That demand hasn’t gone down, even though the economy is improving.

“The continued aging of the U.S. population has created an ever-increasing need for doctors, nurses, physical therapists, and geriatric specialists,” Cobb said. “As people live longer, prosthetic and pharmacological needs are creating new categories of products. The COVID-19 pandemic and the stress it put on hospital systems is triggering retirement and resignations, while the supply remains low.”

Technology

The technology industry has always been in high demand. Technology played a pivotal role as more employees were working from home during the height of the pandemic. But the tech space is so wide and vast that there’s no shortage of needs.

“All programming talents are in demand,” Cobb said. “The demand for game designers, for example, is pervasive as the potential for a new ‘hit’ in the market is profitable and seductive. Cyber-security, data analytics, robotics and AI, in particular, are considered to be part of the ‘next big thing’ for consumers.”

Logistics

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA - APRIL 29: A now hiring advertisement appears on the back of a fuel trucks on April 29, 2021 in Richmond, California. A lack of qualified truck drivers could lead to a shortage and gasoline this summer and could cause prices to spike. A gallon of regular unleaded gas is already at or around $4.00 in parts of California. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
A now hiring advertisement appears on the back of a fuel trucks on April 29, 2021 in Richmond, California. A lack of qualified truck drivers could lead to a shortage and gasoline this summer and could cause prices to spike. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

And technology has only made our lives easier, especially when it comes to online shopping, which is why logistics is also a hot industry.

“E-commerce and Big Box retailers continue to grow while blurring the lines between offline and online shopping,” Cobb said. “Getting the orders filled and delivered has strained an already under-manned talent pool of truck drivers, warehouses and logistics professionals.”

Housing and infrastructure construction

With the Biden administration pushing a $1.7 trillion infrastructure proposal, down from its original $2.3 trillion, construction is poised to get a big boost, opening up even more job opportunities.

“The U.S. federal government has made a big commitment in infrastructure repair and improvement,” Cobb said. “At the same time, growth markets, such as North Carolina, Texas and Tennessee are creating hundreds of jobs in residential construction. Large home builders are also moving to places like Dallas and Nashville.

Alternative energy and alternative agricultural products

Biden’s infrastructure also involves investment in clean energy, in addition to the companies that are already investing in greener technologies and products.

“Demand is growing every day,” Cobb said. “The success of Tesla, Beyond Meat, Impossible Foods, the expansion of wind and solar power generation, and the endorsement by these ‘new businesses’ by the federal government means investors are pouring money into these types of ventures.”

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Dori Zinn is a personal finance journalist based in South Florida. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Forbes, CNET, Quartz, TIME, and others.

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