Free turkeys near me? Here's how to save this Thanksgiving as prices rise

Your Thanksgiving meal will be one of the most expensive amid soaring inflation.

Nearly every ingredient in your holiday meal has a higher price tag this year, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation's annual Thanksgiving dinner cost survey. This can be blamed on inflation and supply chain disruptions.

The average cost of this year’s classic Thanksgiving feast for 10 is $64.05, less than $6.50 per person, the federation's survey shows. It's the priciest meal in the survey's 37 years, and up 20% from $53.31 in 2021.

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Some retailers say consumers can get their full Thanksgiving meals for less than the national average. Other stores have promotions to get a turkey for free when shoppers load up the cart with other items.

Retail giant Walmart said it's selling turkey and many trimmings at last year's prices, while discount grocer Aldi announced it would match 2019 prices for discounts of up to 30%. Lidl said shoppers can get their ingredients for under $30.

And there are also other strategies to combat the rising prices. Here's how to save.

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Who is giving away free turkeys for Thanksgiving?

Sean Turner, co-founder of retail technology company Swiftly, said shoppers are making more decisions based on price, and recommended consumers check store apps and flyers to take advantage of discounts.

"If consumers are willing to do the research," Turner said, "it's still possible to really combat the rise of inflation."

Turner said a Swiftly survey of 1,500 people found 60% of consumers are having smaller dinners with fewer guests this Thanksgiving, and 57% of shoppers are budgeting in anticipation of spending more on their holiday meal.

ShopRite brought back its free turkey or ham promotion for costumers who swipe their Price Plus loyalty card at the register through Nov. 24.

Supermarket chain WinCo is offering free turkey with a $125 purchase until Nov. 23.

At H-E-B, get a free 12-pound turkey with the purchase of a store-brand spiral-sliced half or whole ham.

Shopping tip: While many consumers have started shopping early with concerns over turkey shortages, if you haven't bought the bird yet, you should be able to find one at a lower cost than the Farm Bureau average.

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Is Ibotta doing free Thanksgiving again?

Ibotta, the popular cashback app and rewards platform, brought back its "free Thanksgiving dinner" promotion for the third year, and new users will have access to 100% cashback offers for a turkey and sides..

To participate, new Ibotta users have to create an account, choose the grocery store where they want to shop and purchase select rebate items, including Butterball turkey, Bob Evans Original Mashed Potatoes, Ocean Spray Cranberry Sauce. The maximum value of the cash back reward for new users is $21.15.

♦Shopping tip: Prices can vary by store, so it's possible that the free items might each cost a few cents after the rebates. Shoppers may also find themselves walking away making a few cents.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Thanksgiving dinner could cost more this year: Our tips on how to save