Here are the companies offering sign-up bonuses for new hires

·4 min read

As concerns over labor shortages mount, more employers are offering sign-up bonuses to get workers through the door — even those that traditionally didn’t before.

“Not all employers offer sign-on bonuses, but those who do typically offer sign-on bonuses for roles that are particularly competitive to find high-quality talent for, like a registered nurse, or for roles that they need to hire a high volume of people for, such as a warehouse associate,” said Sarah Stoddard, career expert at Glassdoor.

A sign-up bonus is a one-time payout when you sign a contract to start a new job. They vary based on the position, industry, and even the person getting hired. Sometimes they aren’t publicly listed on job postings, sometimes they are.

LARKSPUR, CALIFORNIA - APRIL 02: A customer walks by a now hiring sign at a BevMo store on April 02, 2021 in Larkspur, California. According to a report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. economy added 916,000 jobs in March and the unemployment rate dropped to 6 percent. Leisure and hospitality jobs led the way with 280,000 new jobs followed by restaurants with 176,000 jobs and construction with 110,000 new positions. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
LARKSPUR, CALIFORNIA - APRIL 02: A customer walks by a now hiring sign at a BevMo store on April 02, 2021 in Larkspur, California. According to a report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. economy added 916,000 jobs in March and the unemployment rate dropped to 6 percent. Leisure and hospitality jobs led the way with 280,000 new jobs followed by restaurants with 176,000 jobs and construction with 110,000 new positions. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Companies offer sign-up, sign-on, or signing bonuses — all variations of the same thing — to entice potential employees to apply and work for them. In hopes to gain the best talent, companies believe the more incentives offered, the better the talent will be. But even if there isn’t a sign-up bonus offered doesn’t mean you can’t get one.

“It’s important to remember that any candidate can try to negotiate a sign-on bonus as part of their total compensation package during the hiring process, especially if they have competing offers from other employers,” Stoddard said.

Which companies offer sign-up bonuses?

Since there’s no set standard on sign-up bonuses, it’s hard to know which companies are offering them unless you see it in a job listing. For instance, certain McDonald’s locations are providing bonuses ranging from $200 to $400, but there’s no amount set by the company itself.

Sinking Spring, PA - April 19: The sign at the McDonald's restaurant on Penn Ave in Sinking Spring, PA April 19, 2021 with a message on a board below it that reads
Sinking Spring, PA - April 19: The sign at the McDonald's restaurant on Penn Ave in Sinking Spring, PA April 19, 2021 with a message on a board below it that reads "Work Here $15 $15 $15". (Photo by Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images)

“Sign-on bonuses can be offered in a wide range of industries, from tech and health care to restaurants and automotive,” Stoddard said. “In some cases, sign-on bonuses are offered in public job listings on sites like Glassdoor, and other times a sign-on bonus is offered to a candidate directly as an extra effort to sweeten the deal.”

Some companies that have listed their sign-up bonuses on Glassdoor include:

  • Amazon $1,500

  • Beacon Health Management: $10,000

  • CRST The Transportation Solution Inc.: $5,000

  • Tri-State Water, Power & Air: $3,000

  • Assured Home Health: $15,000

  • Kelly Ford: $7,500

  • Massage Envy: $300-$500

  • MaidPro: $500

Is a sign-up bonus a good idea?

It’s important to know what you need to do to earn the sign-up bonus. For instance, some deals require you must stay with the company for a certain amount of time. This could be 90 days, six months, or even a year.

If you don’t want to be tied to conditions, there are other types of perks you can negotiate into your contract.

For instance, ask if you can forego the sign-up bonus and instead ask for a salary bump. Or you can request more vacation days or paid time-off than what comes in the standard package offering. If flexible time is important, ask your hiring manager about working from home or remote options.

“While a sign-on bonus is certainly attractive to candidates, keep in mind a person’s annual salary is going to have a more significant impact on their long-term financial wellbeing,” Stoddard said. “That’s why it’s critical to conduct salary research and leverage tools to help prepare candidates to negotiate their salary before accepting an offer.”

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Dori Zinn is a personal finance journalist based in South Florida. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Forbes, CNET, Quartz, TIME, and others.

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