Animal crossing: watch wildlife use sky bridge to cross interstate safely

Louise Hall
·2 min read
Footage posted by the Utah Division of Wildlife showcases an assortment of animals, including deers, bears, and squirrels, moose and porcupines crossing the bridge over the highway (Utah Division of Wildlife Resources/ Facebook)
Footage posted by the Utah Division of Wildlife showcases an assortment of animals, including deers, bears, and squirrels, moose and porcupines crossing the bridge over the highway (Utah Division of Wildlife Resources/ Facebook)

Intriguing new video footage has shown an array of wildlife using an animal-only bridge built in Utah to help creatures cross an interstate safely.

The bridge, built by the Utah Division of Wildlife (UDOT) in 2018, was created to allow animals a safe place to cross to avoid vehicle collisions on the interstate near Salt Lake City.

Video footage posted by the division showcases an assortment of animals, including deers, bears, and squirrels, moose and porcupines crossing the bridge over the highway.

"It's working!" the government organisation wrote in a caption alongside the footage.

They added: "Thanks to the Utah Department of Transportation and Utah State University for monitoring the Parley's Canyon wildlife overpass this year.

“As you can see, the 2nd year of this overpass has been successful at helping wildlife safely migrate over busy Interstate 80 and helping motorists be much safer as well.”

Last year, John Gleason, a UDOT spokesman, said although wildlife typically needs to adjust to habitat changes the division was convinced they were “seeing results” from the bridge.

“It’s not something that they adapt to suddenly,“ Mr Gleason told CNN affiliate KSL in 2019.

“We’re seeing results, and it’s an unexpected success to see results this early. We thought it would take potentially years for the wildlife to be familiar and to start using this bridge.”

The division has previously urged hikers and bikers to stay off the overpass, warning it could scare animals from using the bridge.

The crossing, which reportedly cost $5m, is covered with dirt, rocks, and boulders to make the surroundings more recognisable to wildlife.

“We want to make the bridge feel as much a part of the surroundings as we can,” Mr Gleason told The Salt Lake Tribune in 2019. “It’s a win for both wildlife and people that drive on the road.”

Read More

Which non-native species threaten UK wildlife?

Conservationists unite in a unique declaration to protect wildlife

Climate crisis ‘shifting infectious animal diseases’

Climate crisis ‘shifting infectious animal diseases’